We’re made for helping others find their way.

At Zucker Hillside Hospital, it doesn’t just take clinical knowledge and skill to do what we do. It takes a special spark, a unique passion for treating patients as the unique and valued individuals they are. We’re profoundly committed to the compassionate care of people suffering from a wide range of behavioral conditions and addictions. We’re also passionate about our leadership role in the field as we pursue new treatments and solutions for helping people through extremely difficult challenges.

“As co-chair for the Evidence-Based Practice and Nursing Research committee at Zucker, I’m focused on initiating practices to improve patient care and satisfaction.”

–Tara Shajan, RN

We’re excited to be able to share our knowledge and best practices with the behavioral health community at the American Psychiatric Nurses Association’s 31st Annual Conference this October in Phoenix, Arizona! We spoke with two of the nurses from Zucker Hillside Hospital who will present their findings at the conference, and here is a sneak peek at their research topics:

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) – Trish Woloszyn, RN

DBT is an evidence-based practice therapy created to help the many people suffering from borderline personality or impulse control issues. By uniting cognitive behavioral therapy with Buddhist meditative practices, it combines the best of our advanced knowledge with ancient wisdom. The treatment involves exercises in mindfulness, emotional regulation and distress tolerance and acceptance. Ours is the first inpatient adolescent unit in the country to incorporate this into practice. We’re seeing amazing results in terms of constant observation as well as a decrease in self-injurious and suicidal behavior. So far, we’ve sent eight core staff members from all disciplines for intensive DBT training. We’re continuing to have more staff trained, including nursing staff, so they can gain a greater understanding about the ways DBT can help our patients.

The Importance of Noise Control – Tara Shajan, RN

We weren’t  satisfied with our Press Ganey score for patient experience related to noise level. I led an initiative with our RNs and other staff to modify the practices on the unit to control the level of noise on the unit after 11 pm. The change in our mean score since the implementation of the new process has been remarkable – rising from 27 to 72 in just one year. This is a tremendous change. Essentially: Reducing noise level can contribute to improving quiet and therapeutic healing environment and thus enhance patient experience. With these changes, we have completed the goal of bringing up the satisfaction of the patients of the units during the night time. Since the initiative, the staff who would never paid attention to noise change are now aware of it and there is a big culture change . Patients are able to get a good night’s sleep. The improved Press Ganey patient satisfaction score is proof it’s working.

“We found that reducing noise level can improve the therapeutic healing environment and thus enhance patient experience.”

–Tara Shajan, RN

At Zucker Hillside Hospital, we are rejuvenating our nursing research and are committed to encouraging nurses like Trish and Tara to explore untapped possibilities and to discover new and better ways to deliver exceptional patient care. If you’re made for advancing your clinical practice, Zucker Hillside Hospital is made for you.

“The nursing department at Zucker Hillside Hospital has been very invested in promoting nursing research to all the nursing staff.”

— Trish Woloszyn, RN

Think you might be made for a career in Behavioral Health? Explore available careers here!

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